Mark Sutton – Life Through a Lens – Curtain Call

Mark Sutton – Life Through a Lens – Curtain Call
F1 photographer Mark Sutton talks through his favourite shots from the season ending Abu Dhabi Grand Prix and F1 Test.
Camera model : Nikon D4S | Exposure time: 1/500s | Aperture: F4 | ISO speed: 1600 | Lens: 500mm Telephoto.
Camera model : Nikon D4S | Exposure time: 1/500s | Aperture: F4 | ISO speed: 1600 | Lens: 500mm Telephoto.
Camera model : Nikon D4S | Exposure time: 1/500s | Aperture: F4 | ISO speed: 1600 | Lens: 500mm Telephoto.
Tears of VictoryI like these three frames because they tell a story. Lewis Hamilton let the emotions come out at this point. He’s wiping his brow, you can see the glint, on the next one he’s crying, and then he’s closed his eyes. Obviously he told Martin Brundle on the podium it meant more than his first championship in 2008, I don’t know whether I believe him or not as the first one has to be the most special! He could go on to match Sebastian Vettel and win four because he is the man to beat now. It was a great end to a brilliant season to be honest, I think, whether you’re a Lewis fan or not, you have to agree the right man won the title when you look at the stats.

Camera model: Nikon D4S | Exposure time: 1/500s | Aperture: F4.5 | ISO speed : 1600 | Lens: 70-200mm Zoom.
Catch Me If You CanFelipe was in massive celebration mode and literally jumped from the car into the arms of his mechanics. When he came in to parc ferme he was pumping his fists, the team was all there shouting at him, then he just lept – nearly over the barrier. It’s carnage, as the whole celebration in Abu Dhabi was. Felipe Massa is such a loved figure and it’s great to see he’s revived his career at Williams this season. Hopefully they can push on next season with that Mercedes engine and challenge for some wins.

Camera model: Nikon D4S |Exposure time: 1/640’s | Aperture: F/5 | ISO speed : 1600 | Lens: 24-70mm Zoom.
Diamonds Are ForeverI put these pictures on because I had these pictures on Daily Mail Online. I remember photographing Geri Halliwell at a race a few years ago when she was on a balcony drinking a Red Bull can. I didn’t know whether she knew me so I went and told her I was that photographer, she remembered the picture being in magazines. That’s when she asked my name and as I said “Mark Sutton” she took a photo of me. The good thing about this picture is she normally she hides her hand and engagement ring. The reason the Mail used it was because you can see the engagement ring, for them it’s the perfect shot. I felt a bit like paparazzi in the pits but she’s there, she’s a famous person and she’s part of the event.

Camera model: Nikon D4S | Exposure time: 1/250’s | Aperture: F/5.6 | ISO speed: 1000 | Lens: 24-70mm Zoom.
Happy Go LuckyPharrell Williams was one of the big stars of the event; being one of Lewis Hamilton’s friends he was present quite a lot in the post-race celebrations. He was at a race a few years ago and I got him to sign the back of my business card for my kids! I’ve still got it at home. They didn’t know him then, he was just a producer, but now he’s a big star after that song Happy – which was despicable! He had a few bouncers who were a bit aggressive but I managed to get this great shot. I was shouting “Pharrell, Pharrell” and he gave us that sign – it’s the peace sign, not the V sign, which is important! It’s a good shot as his glasses are a bit whacky and he’s a bit of a character. Abu Dhabi was quite a lot about celebrities as it’s the final race of the season. Pharrell was performing on Saturday night at the circuit but I hear he had to go off after two songs because he was struggling, possibly because he’d enjoyed himself a little too much the night before….

Camera model: Nikon D4S | Exposure time: 1/400s | Aperture: F20 | ISO speed : 1600 | Lens: 24-70mm Zoom.
Camera model: Nikon D4S | Exposure time: 1/400s |Aperture: | ISO speed: 400 | Lens: 70-200mm Zoom.
A Damp SquibAfter the grand prix there was a two-day test and all eyes were on McLaren Honda. This image stood out for me. McLaren’s guys have all lined up on the pit wall to see their car come past, which I thought would make a great photo on its own. In the end the car never came past and about one second after this was taken they heard Stoffel Vandoorne complain on the radio that the car had broken down again. They turned round and said it was a bad omen and that they wouldn’t do it again. A lot of the Honda engineers were there and they were all remarkably young – maybe Bernie should come down and have a look! It was a funny moment and it’s been captured, it’s the start of the McLaren Honda story. I like the picture of the breakdown as well because in the background it says “Bernie says: Think before you drive”, which is quite unfortunate placement if you’re McLaren Honda!

Camera model: Nikon D4S | Exposure time: 1/250s Aperture: F8 | ISO speed: 1600 | Lens: 70-200mm Zoom.
No Country For Old MenBernie Ecclestone recently came out with a funny statement that Formula One wasn’t for young people, which we all disagree with and know the future is with kids. F1 in Schools is a great project for the future and Williams have realised that – they’re taking on ten students every year. Basically they pick the best students to go into an academy and become engineers within the factor. They’ll be part of the Williams project and be nurtured all the way through their early careers; from being young boys and girls at school and through to university and then on to be Williams’ aerodynamicists for the future. I think sometimes Bernie doesn’t understand the real world and it’s frustrating when he says things like that because I think lots of young people not only watch F1 but want to be in the sport in the future. This is Collosus F1 winning the prize for the 2014 event and you can see how much it means to all of them.

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